birth mother expenses by state

The financial impact of pregnancy and childbirth is one of the biggest stressors expectant mothers face. As pregnant women explore their options, many wonder how their pregnancy expenses will be paid.

If you are considering adoption, there are probably several questions swirling around your head. How much does adoption cost? How will I cover my living expenses during pregnancy? Who will pay my medical bills?

The good news is that there are resources to provide birth mothers with financial support during their pregnancy. Below, we’ll explore the birth mother expenses by state that can be covered by an adoptive family.

Can Birth Mothers Have Expenses Covered?

If you’ve been exploring your options, you may have decided that adoption is the best choice for you. Well, maybe you’ve decided adoption is the best option if you could determine how much the adoption will cost.

The good news is that there is no cost for putting a child up for adoption. The adoption process is free, allowing birth mothers to focus on their physical health and mental wellbeing.

Learning that there is no cost to the adoption process for birth mothers will certainly ease your worries. Still, financial struggles can be a burden. Pregnancy comes with its own set of expenses. The great news is that financial assistance is available for birth mothers who choose adoption.

Birth mother expenses are court-approved funds given to the birth mother from the hopeful adoptive family. Since each state has different adoption laws, birth mother expenses vary depending on the state you live in during your pregnancy. Birth mother expenses by state also depend on your specific needs as a prospective birth mother.

Depending on the adoption laws, birth mother expenses by state can include help with:

  • Rent
  • Utilities
  • Transportation
  • Maternity Clothes
  • Cell Phones
  • Medical Expenses
  • Food
  • Other Grocery Needs

Choosing adoption is a brave and selfless decision. That’s why state regulations have changed. They now provide birth mothers with the respect and support they deserve through the adoption process.

Birth Mother Expenses By State

Now that you know that financial assistance is available, let’s take a look at what’s covered by birth mother expenses by state:

*Please Note: This may not be a comprehensive list, so please consult an adoption agency in your state for more information.

StateExpenses Covered
AlabamaMaternity-connected medical or hospital and necessary living expenses of the mother are covered. This includes legitimate charges for medical, legal, prenatal, and other professional services. See the Alabama statute here.
AlaskaChildbirth expenses, prenatal and confinement medical or hospital care, services related to the adoption.
See the Alaska statute here.
ArizonaAny reasonable and necessary expenses in connection with the adoption for a parent of a child placed for adoption, including:
  • Medical costs
  • Hospital care
  • Medical examinations for the mother and child
  • Counseling fees
  • Legal fees Agency fees
  • Living expenses
  • Any other costs the court finds reasonable and necessary
See the Arizona statute here.
ArkansasIncidental costs for prenatal, delivery, and postnatal care may be assessed for payment. This includes:
  • Reasonable housing costs
  • Food
  • Clothing
  • General maintenance
  • Medical expenses
See the Arkansas statute here.
California
  • Attorney’s fees
  • Medical fees and expenses
  • Hospital fees and expenses
  • Counseling fees
  • Necessary living expenses of the birth mother preceding and during confinement
See the California statute here.
ColoradoPhysician fees, attorney fees, other charges, and fees as approved by the courts.
See the Colorado statute here.
ConnecticutSince birth parent counseling is required within 72 hours of the child’s birth, birth parent counseling expenses, including the cost of adoption, can be covered. Other birth mother expenses include living expenses to not exceed $1,500 and reasonable telephone charges and maternity clothing expenses.
See the Connecticut statute here.
DelawareCourt costs and legal fees only. See Delaware statute here.
District of ColumbiaA child-placing agency can charge an adoptive parent the actual costs of:
  • Living expenses of a birth mother, including:
  • Food
  • Shelter
  • Clothing
  • Counseling by an independent mental health professional
  • Medical expenses
  • Costs of transportation to obtain medical or adoption-related services
  • Other reasonable fees including those related to:
    • Customary and reasonable legal expenses
    • Cost of locating an absent birth parent
    • Foster care expenses not to exceed 120 daysAny other reasonable legal or medical expense related to the adoption process
See the District of Columbia statute here.
Florida
  • Reasonable living expenses of the birth mother that she is unable to pay due to unemployment, underemployment, or disability
  • Fees, costs, and expenses including:
    • Rent
    • Utilities
    • Basic telephone service
    • Food
    • Toiletries
    • Necessary clothing
    • Transportation
    • Insurance
  • Expenses found necessary for the health and well-being of the birth mother and unborn child by the court.
  • Reasonable and necessary medical expenses
All expenses can be paid during the pregnancy and for a period of up to 6 weeks postpartum. See the Florida statute here.
GeorgiaPayment of medical expenses directly related to the mother’s pregnancy and hospitalization for the child’s birth and medical care is allowed.
See the Georgia statute here.
HawaiiBirth mother expenses by state are not addressed by Hawaii statute.
IdahoLegal and medical costs and reasonable maternity and living expenses during the pregnancy and for a period not to exceed 6 weeks postpartum based on demonstrated financial need.
See the Idaho statute here.
Illinois
  • Reasonable and actual medical fees or hospital charges for services rendered in connection with the birth of the child to be adopted and legal fees
  • Reasonable living expenses related to activities of daily living and meeting basic needs, including the following for no more than 60 days after the birth of the child:
    • Lodging
    • Food
    • Clothing
  • Prospective adoptive parents may also give a gift or gifts or other things of value to a birth parent provided that the total value of gifts does not exceed $200.
See the Illinois statute here.
IndianaPayment of the following expenses is permitted:
  • Reasonable attorney fees
  • Hospital and medical costs related to birth mother’s pregnancy, labor, and delivery
  • Reasonable expenses for psychological counseling, travel expenses, and maternity clothes
  • Living expenses that include the following during the 2nd and 3rd trimester of pregnancy:
    • Housing
    • Utilities
    • Phone service
  • Any additional living expenses approved by the court
  • Reimbursement of wages lost due to the birth mother’s inability to work her regular, existing employment due to a medical condition
See the Indiana statute here.
Iowa
  • Expenses incurred in connection with childbirth, placement of the child, and legal costs related to adoption
  • Pregnancy-related medical care received by birth mother or child during the pregnancy, delivery, and for medically necessary postpartum care
  • Living expenses of the mother
  • Costs of counseling
See the Iowa statute here.
KansasPregnancy or childbirth-related medical expenses of the birth mother or child and reasonable living expenses of the mother incurred during or due to the pregnancy.
See the Kansas statute here.
KentuckyFees for legal services, cost of placement services, and expenses of birth parents are allowed.
See the Kentucky statute here.
LouisianaBirth mother expenses by state for Louisiana include:
  • Reasonable medical expenses. This includes:
    • Hospital expenses, testing, nursing, pharmaceutical, travel, and other costs incurred by the birth mother and child for prenatal care and childbirth.
  • Reasonable expenses for mental health counseling services provided to birth parents or children for a reasonable time before and after the child’s adoption placement.
  • Reasonable expenses incurred in acquiring the Statement of Family History information required by articles 1124 and 1125.
  • Reasonable living expenses incurred by a mother for a reasonable time before childbirth and no more than 45 days after birth.
  • Reasonable attorney fees, court costs, travel, and other expenses related to the adoption process.
  • Any other service or fee the court finds is reasonable and necessary.
See the Louisiana statute here.
Maine
  • Legal fees and expenses related to the adoption process
  • Prenatal and postnatal counseling expenses for the birth mother
  • Prenatal, birthing, and other related medical expenses for the birth mother
  • Necessary transportation expenses to obtain these services
  • Foster care expenses for the child
  • Necessary living expenses for birth mother and child
  • Fees and expenses for services provided by a licensed child-placing agency
  • Legal and counseling expenses for the birth father related to the adoption process
See the Maine statute here.
MarylandReasonable expenses for the following are covered:
  • Adoption counseling
  • Hospital, legal, and medical services
  • Transportation for medical care associated with pregnancy or childbirth
  • Food, clothing, and shelter if the birth mother is unable to work because of medical reasons associated with pregnancy or childbirth
See the Maryland statute here.
MassachusettsBirth mother expenses by state are not addressed by the Massachusetts statute.
Michigan
  • Medical, hospital, nursing, and pharmaceutical expenses incurred by the birth mother or the child in connection with the birth or any illness of the child
  • Counseling services
  • Living expenses of a mother before the birth of the child and no more than 6 weeks after birth
  • Travel expenses associated with the adoption
  • Any expense incurred in acquiring birth family information for the adoption process
See the Michigan statute here.
MinnesotaReasonable expenses related to:
  • Counseling, medical, and legal fees
  • Transportation, meals, and lodging related to these services
  • Adoption-agency services
  • Living expenses that are needed to maintain an adequate standard of living that the birth mother would otherwise be unable to maintain because of loss of income or other support resulting from the pregnancy
See the Minnesota statute here.
Mississippi
  • Legal and attorney fees
  • Reasonable and actual medical fees or hospital charges for services rendered in connection with the birth or medical treatment of the child
  • Birth mother living expenses
  • Counseling for the birth parents
See the Mississippi statute here.
Missouri
  • Hospital, medical, or physician expenses incurred by the mother or child
  • Counseling services for a reasonable time before and after adoption
  • Pre-placement assessment expenses
  • Reasonable legal expenses
  • Court costs
  • Travel
  • Other administrative expenses in connection with the adoption
  • Reasonable living expenses including:
    • Food
    • Shelter
    • Utilities
    • Transportation
    • Clothing expenses for birth parents and the child that are within the norms of the community in which the birth mother resides
See the Missouri statute here.
Montana
  • Medical care or services
  • Prenatal care
  • Counseling expenses for a maximum of 10 hours
  • Travel or temporary living costs
  • Legal fees
  • Other reasonable costs related to adoption
See the Montana statute here.
NebraskaBirth mother expenses by state are not addressed by Nebraska statute.
NevadaMedical expenses and other necessary living expenses related to the birth of the child.
See the Nevada statute here.
New HampshireReasonable expenses for:
  • Counseling
  • Medical services
  • Legal services
  • Transportation
  • Lodging
  • Clothing
  • Food expenses incurred through the adoption process
  • Adoption services provided by an agency are covered
  • Reasonable living expenses of the birth mother to maintain an adequate standard of living when she is unable to due to loss of wages caused by pregnancy or delivery
See the New Hampshire statute here.
New JerseyThe adoptive parent is permitted to provide payment for:
  • Medical, hospital, counseling, or other similar expenses in connection with the birth or illness of the child
  • Reasonable living expenses, including:
    • Food
    • Clothing
    • Medical
    • Shelter
    • Religious, psychological, vocational, or similar counseling services
  • Legal fees and costs
See the New Jersey statute here.
New MexicoA prospective adoptive parent shall make payments for services relating to the adoption that are reasonable and actual fees or charges for the following:
  • Medical, hospital, nursing, pharmaceutical, travel, or similar expenses incurred by the birth mother or child
  • Reasonable counseling services
  • Living expenses of a mother and her dependent children for a reasonable time before or after the child’s birth or placement
  • Expenses incurred for the purposes of full disclosure
  • Legal service performed for a parent who consents to the adoption
  • Any other service or expense the court finds reasonably necessary relating to the adoption process
See the New Mexico statute here.
New YorkBirth mother expenses allowed include reasonable and actual costs for:
  • Medical fees or hospital charges related to childbirth and pregnancy
  • Nursing, medical, or hospital fees for the care of the child
  • Reasonable and actual expenses for the birth mother for housing, maternity clothing, clothing for the child, and transportation.
See the New York statute here.
North CarolinaNorth Carolina adoption laws allow the following birth parent expenses:
  • Medical, hospital, nursing, pharmaceutical, travel, and other similar expenses incurred by a birth mother of her child for pregnancy and childbirth.
  • Counseling services directly related to the adoption provided by a licensed psychiatrist, licensed psychologist, licensed family therapist, licensed professional counselor, licensed or certified social worker, fee-based pastoral counselor, or other licensed professional counselors.
  • Ordinary living expenses during pregnancy
  • Legal service fees related to adoption
See North Carolina statute here.
North Dakota
  • Medical expenses related to prenatal care and childbirth that are not covered by health insurance
  • Expenses for transportation, meals, and lodging related to pregnancy, birth, or adoption
  • Living expenses needed to maintain an adequate standard of living if the birth mother is unable to maintain because of loss of income or other support resulting from pregnancy
See the North Dakota statute here.
Ohio
  • Physician, hospital, and other medical expenses related to prenatal care, delivery, and confinement before or following childbirth
  • Court and attorney fees and expenses
  • Living expenses not exceeding $3,000 through the 60th day after childbirth include:
    • Rent or mortgage payments
    • Utility payments
    • Food
    • Household goods
    • Personal care items
    • Transportation costs
See the Ohio statute here.
OklahomaReasonable fees for the following:
  • Attorney fees, court costs, and medical expenses for birth mother and child
  • Adoption counseling
  • Travel and transportation costs for medical or adoption placement needs
  • Living expenses including:
    • Housing
    • Utilities
    • Food
    • Transportation costs
    • Childcare for any minor child of the birth mother associated with pregnancy-related medical care
    • Other necessities
Prospective adoptive parents may also give a one-time gift to the birth mother of no greater value than $100.
See the Oklahoma statute here.
OregonLegal, medical, living, and travel expenses that are included in the written disclosure statement.
See the Oregon statute here.
Pennsylvania
  • Medical and hospital expenses incurred by the birth mother for prenatal care
  • Medical and hospital expenses incurred by the birth mother and child during childbirth
  • Medical, hospital, and foster care expenses before the adoption
See the Pennsylvania statute here.
Rhode IslandBirth mother expenses by state are not addressed by Rhode Island statute.
South Carolina
  • Necessary and actual medical costs
  • Reasonable living expenses for the birth mother and the child for a reasonable time
  • Reasonable attorney’s fees and costs
  • Reasonable fees to child-placing agencies
See the South Carolina statute here.
South DakotaOnly charges approved by the court are allowed.
See the South Dakota statute here.
Tennessee
  • Reasonable expenses and fees for hospital or medical services related to childbirth
  • Medical care and other birth-related expenses for mother or child
  • Counseling fees for birth parent
  • Reasonable legal fees
  • Reasonable and actual living expenses for:
    • Housing
    • Food
    • Maternity clothing
    • Child’s clothing
    • Utilities
    • Transportation
See the Tennessee statute here.
Texas
  • Attorney, social worker, mental health professional, or physician services and fees
  • Legal and medical expenses
  • Pregnancy-related expenses paid by a child-placing agency, which may include:
    • Housing
    • Food
    • Maternity clothing
    • Utilities
    • Transportation
See the Texas statute here.
UtahReasonable adoption-related expenses of the mother or father of the adopted child, including:
  • Legal expenses
  • Maternity expenses
  • Medical and hospital expenses
  • Counseling expenses
  • Temporary living expenses during pregnancy and childbirth
  • Pregnancy or adoption-related travel expenses
See the Utah statute here.
Vermont
  • Medical, hospital, nursing, pharmaceutical, or other similar expenses related to prenatal care or childbirth
  • Counseling services
  • Living expenses for birth mother within a reasonable time before and after childbirth
  • Legal services
  • Transportation
  • Any other service or expense the court finds reasonable and necessary
See the Vermont statute here.
Virginia
  • Medical expenses and insurance premiums directly related to the birth mother’s pregnancy
  • Mental health counseling for birth mother and father
  • Reasonable and necessary living expenses for food, clothing, and shelter if the birth mother is unable to work due to pregnancy
  • Expenses related to court appearances, including food, lodging, and transportation
  • Legal service fees
  • Transportation for any services mentioned above
See the Virginia statute here.
Washington
  • Prenatal hospital or medical expenses
  • Hospital or medical expenses related to childbirth
  • Attorney’s fees and court costs
See the Washington statute here.
West VirginiaReasonable and customary fees associated with pregnancy, birth, and adoption proceedings, including:
  • Legal expenses
  • Medical expenses
  • Hospital expenses
  • Other fees and expenses authorized by the law and approved by the court
See the West Virginia statute here.
WisconsinAdoptive parents may pay the actual cost of the following:
  • Pre and post-adoption counseling
  • Maternity clothes in an amount not to exceed $300
  • Local transportation expenses related to pregnancy or adoption
  • Medical and hospital care in connection to pregnancy or childbirth
  • Medical and hospital care for the child
  • Legal services in connection with the adoption
  • Living expenses necessary to protect the health and welfare of the birth mother, not to exceed $5,000
  • Birthing classes
  • A gift to the child’s birth mother not to exceed $100 in value
See the Wisconsin statute here.
WyomingBirth mother expenses by state are not addressed by Wyoming statutes. Each adoption is handled on a case by case basis.

Get Help With Birth Mother Expenses From The Supportive Team At Texas Adoption Center

At Texas Adoption Center, our team of professionals is passionate about making you feel safe and supported in your decisions. Even when things get complicated, we help you find the hope you need to embrace the better days ahead. As you make the right choice for yourself and your baby, our goal is to give you the information you need to choose with confidence.

In addition to the latest information about birth mother expenses by state, we provide the following essential services to our clients:

  • Emotional Support
  • Financial Support
  • Medical Care and Health Insurance
  • Housing and Transportation Assistance

For more information on the resources available to you, contact Texas Adoption Center at (512) 893-7943.

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